Judo & Blind Judo

Judo & Blind Judo

The judo and blind judo competitions will take place at the Heydar Aliyev Arena, over three days. The judo competition will consist of seven weight categories for men and women; four weight categories for the men's blind judo competition and two for the women's blind judo competition.

Judo originally emerged from jujitsu as a martial art and was further developed as a competitive sport by Jigaro Kano, a Japanese educationalist, sport activist, and philosopher. Combatants – known as judokas – aim to either throw an opponent to the floor, subdue them with a pin, or force the opponent to submit with a choke or an arm lock. Judo made its Olympic debut during the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games.

The sport was dropped from the Mexico Games in 1968 and was returned to the Olympics only four years later. Women’s judo made its first appearance as a demonstration sport in 1988 and four years later, in 1992, it was included as a full medal sport in the Barcelona Games.

Facts and figures:

  • Judo's visibility in the international arena significantly increased after the introduction of the World Judo Championships, the highest form of international judo competition, in 1956
  • Judo has a hierarchal ranking system – ranks being defined as ‘kyu’ and ‘dan’; with ‘kyu’ representing the lowest grades while ‘dan’ is the highest grade

Blind Judo

Contests always start with the two competitors in a loose grip on each other's judo suits (grip called a "Kumikata") and if contact is broken, "matte" (wait), or stop, is called and the competitors return to centre and re-grip.

Facts and figures:

  • Judo is one of the few competitive sports that the visually impaired athletes can participate
  • World class competition for male blind athletes has been available since the mid-1980’s

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